Start Radiocarbon dating is used to date

Radiocarbon dating is used to date

Due to the sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometers, carbon dating small particles like blood particles, a grain, or a seed have been made possible.

There are essentially two parts in the process of radiocarbon dating through accelerator mass spectrometry.

The first part involves accelerating the ions to extraordinarily high kinetic energies, and the subsequent step involves mass analysis.

At this stage, other negatively charged atoms are unstable and cannot reach the detector.

This is done by conversion to carbon dioxide with subsequent graphitization in the presence of a metal catalyst.

At this stage, molecules that may be present are eliminated because they cannot exist in this triple charged state.

The carbon atoms with triple positive charge further accelerate away from the positive terminal and pass through another set of focusing devices where mass analysis occurs.

There are two accelerator systems commonly used for radiocarbon dating through accelerator mass spectrometry.