Start Doesn t carbon dating work rocks

Doesn t carbon dating work rocks

But crystals from supposedly billion-year-old granites are packed with helium.

Although these particular isotopes are not used to date rocks, they illustrate that radioisotope decay (radiodecay) is not always constant.

Second, rocks observed to form on a particular date often show radioisotope age estimates far exceeding their actual ages. Helens was only ten years old, it showed a radioisotope age estimate of 340,000 years!

Also, as hot liquid magma cools to form solid granite, it can only capture the short-lived polonium radiohalos at a specific temperature range—allowing a time window of just days.

Assigning a date requires that the rate at which the parent decays into the daughter element has been the same throughout the rock’s history.

But two observations and two clues omitted from physics textbook discussions of radiodating show that these radioisotope “clocks” are broken.

First, scientists have observed that radioactive isotope (radioisotope) decay rates do fluctuate, including Th-228, Rn-22, and Si-32.

It is similar to assuming that the constriction in an hourglass has always been the same diameter, and the same number of sand grains passes every minute.