Start Dating description definitions

Dating description definitions

The beginning of earlywood formation and the end of the latewood formation form one annual ring, which usually extends around the entire circumference of the tree.

The science that uses tree rings to study changes in river flow, surface runoff, and lake levels.

Example: analyzing ring widths of trees to determine how much rainfall fell per year long before weather records were kept.

The science that uses tree rings to study factors that affect the earth's ecosystems.

In fact, the introduction of "divergence" into the dendro-lexicon in the late 1990s epitomized the changing response of trees to climate over time, first scrutinized in detail in the mid-1980s. Perhaps it actually "Paradoxically, in suggesting that this term now be dropped from use, we pay a most fitting tribute to its vital role in the history of geology." -- Stephen Jay Gould, 1965, "Is uniformitarianism necessary"?

This principle states that matching patterns in ring widths or other ring characteristics (such as ring density patterns) among several tree-ring series allows the identification of the exact calendar (or relative) year in which each tree ring was formed.

Example: dating the growth suppressions left in tree rings from western spruce budworm outbreaks in the past.

A layer of wood cells produced by a tree or shrub in one year, usually consisting of thin-walled cells formed early in the growing season (called earlywood) and thicker-walled cells produced later in the growing season (called latewood).

NOTE TO READERS You may notice that the principles below represent a major change in the way we approach dendrochronology.