Start 5 facts about dating violence

5 facts about dating violence

Teen dating violence and sexual assault is estimated to occur between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth at about the same rate as in straight teen relationships.

FACT: There are many reasons youth may stay in abusive relationship: fear, wanting to be loved and needed, having a partner may be important to a youth’s social status, believing the abuser’s apologies and promises to never do it again, peer pressure, loss of self-confidence, not recognizing what’s happening is abusive, and the impact of TV, music, movies and other forms of media that normalize violence.

Teen dating violence can be very dangerous - sometimes lethal.

Results of teen dating violence and sexual assault include serious physical harm, emotional damage, sexually transmitted disease, unwanted pregnancy, and death.

One in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Some victims provoke the violence committed by their dates by making them jealous, acting mean, or teasing them into thinking they want to have sex.

40% of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 say they know someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend and women ages 16-24 experience the highest rate per capita of intimate violence. FACT: Teen dating violence and sexual assault is estimated to occur between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth at about the same rate as in straight teen relationships.

Fact: First, teen dating violence isn’t just limited to arguing.

It includes physical, sexual, and emotional/psychological abuse, and stalking — all of which are very real and can be very damaging.

FACT: Teen dating violence is as common as domestic violence in adult relationships.